3 Deadly Cancers Which Kill Nigerian Men Like Fowl Every Day

what-is-cancer

A good number of deadly cancers are not known to many Nigerian men. Some of these cancers do not kill in high numbers, but when someone is affected, they become a terminal disease.

A terminal disease is a disease in which if an individual contacts, he should be ready for his eventual death at any moment onward.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), Nigeria has the highest rate of cancer in Africa, with the figure possibly reaching about 13 million in 2030. Every year, 10,000 Nigerians die as a result of cancer-related deaths, while 250,000 new cases of cancer are recorded annually.

The list of deadly cancers common among Nigerian men include: leukaemia (white blood cells cancers), lung, colorectal (colon), liver, prostrate, throat, among the rest. However, the three top cancers are: prostrate, liver and colon

  1. Prostrate

In a research work published in Pan African Medical Journal in August 10, 2013, a study carried out in Lagos to find out the rate at which men are affected with prostrate cancer revealed there was a high prevalence of prostate cancer in the community of Lagos, which was much higher than the previously known figure.

Majority of the men examined already have advanced and high grade cancers and did not even seek for medical treatment.

In addition, there are so many men who are suffering from prostrate cancer, but are dying in silence. Prostrate cancer when it affects a man leads to a situation, whereby it could be difficult for the affected man to pass out urine or perform $exual activities.

  1. Liver

Liver cancer just like all other cancers is very lethal. It kills gradually.

One big challenge of liver cancer is that it is a metastasis. That is, it is a cancer which spreads to other regions of the body, apart from where it starts. This means if a man has liver cancer, the cancer will spread to other vital organs in his body.

Liver cancer begins in the cells of the liver before it becomes a malignant tumour. Men who come up with this type of cancer hardly survive it.

  1. Colorectal

Colorectal cancer is also called colon cancer.

Every year, the month of March is used to mark the colon cancer awareness month (commonly called colon cancer awareness month).

Most Nigerians are not aware of colon cancer; yet it is one of the commonest cancers, globally. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in Nigerian men (after prostate and liver cancer).

According to the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy (CECP) in Nigeria, every two hours, a Nigerian is diagnosed of colon cancer.

About 80% of all Nigerians who are diagnosed of colon cancer die from it. This is sad and very unfortunate; given the fact that colon cancer is one of the cancers that is virtually 100% preventable.

The colon and rectum (in our local language are called abodi, afoanu etc). They are the last part of the digestive system. Rectum helps absorb water and salt from the food matter to form faeces or stool that then passes out from the body.

The colon is a muscular tube about five feet long while the rectum. It is the final six inches of the digestive system, where faeces is stored until it passes out of the body through the anus.

Most colon cancers develop slowly, over 10 to 15 years. It usually begins as a small non-cancerous growth, called polyp on the inner lining of the colon or rectum.

It should be noted that so many factors trigger abnormal proliferation of cells, which is known as cancer. These factors include: exposure to radiation, some food, unhealthy lifestyle, heredity, and other carcinogenic substances.

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